#TheOTShow: Eating sushi, building railroads and surviving the zombie apocalypse: using the new generation of board games in forensic mental health

I was recently approached about presenting at this year’s OT Show in Birmingham. My thoughts immediately darted to a new board games group I was trialling in the medium secure unit where I work. And each time I came up with a different idea, I felt the magnetic pull back to board games.

I’ve often asked myself why the idea of using board games in forensic mental health appeals to me so strongly. Is it because board games encourage you to focus your attention on something outside of yourself? That they provide a vehicle for interaction with others? The challenge or the immediacy of feedback they provide? The clarity of rules? Or because they have the potential to absorb you into a different reality, where you can experiment with different personas or ways of dealing with situations? Board games are awesome for all these reasons and more. And, even though I was an avid board gamer before trialling this group, the benefits of this group – both for assessment, and the outcomes individuals experienced – surprised me.

You can find the abstract for my session below. The presentation will take place on 22nd November 2018 11:15-12:00 at the NEC in Birmingham.

“Eating sushi, building railroads and surviving the zombie apocalypse: using the new generation of board games in forensic mental health”

Prezi

Board games are experiencing a resurgence in popularity amongst adults – particularly millennials (Graham, 2016) – and the modern selection of games is constantly growing. Board games provide a way to connect with others through a shared activity, and social groups dedicated to board gaming are sprouting up across the world.

With this in mind, the medium secure unit at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust launched a twelve-week structured intervention group using engagement in modern board games both as “means” (intervention – Gray, 1998, pg. 358) and “end” (desired outcome/goal – pg. 357). Playing a different game each week, group participants (‘players’) are introduced to a range of game mechanics and types. Not only does this increase occupational understanding, but it also provides valuable opportunities for players to explore and develop their interests, skills, preferences and self efficacy.

This presentation will provide an overview of the group structure, and will include a case study highlighting outcomes from the intervention. The focus throughout the programme is on translating the occupation out of the group environment and into players’ individual contexts, and the presentation will explore practical ways to do so.

It is anticipated that this session will be of particular interest to clinicians and students working in mental health settings, however it may also be applicable to other clinical areas.

References:

Graham, L (2016) ‘Millenials are driving the board games revival’, CNBC, 22 December [Online]. Available at: https://www.cnbc.com/2016/12/22/millennials-the-board-games-revival-catan-pandemic.html (Accessed: 14 April 2018)

Gray, J. (1998) ‘Putting occupation into practice: Occupation as ends, occupation as means’, American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 52(5), 354-364

 

Resources:

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‘Occupation Matters in Eating Disorders’ – References for Plymouth University Presentation

Presentation: Sorlie C, Biddle L, Cowan M (2015) ‘Occupation Matters in Eating Disorders’, presentation on 18th March at Plymouth University

References

Elliot M (2012) ‘Figured World of Eating Disorders: Occupations of Illness‘, Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 79(1), 15-22

Lock L, Pepin G (2010) Eating disorders. In: in Brown C, Stoffel VC, eds. Occupational therapy in mental health: a vision for participation. Philadelphia, PA: FA Davis Company. 123-142

Mandel DR, Jackson JM, Zemke R, Nelson L, Clark FA (1999) Lifestyle redesign: implementing the Well Elderly Programme. Bethesda, MD: AOTA Press

Molineux M (2011) ‘Standing firm on shifting sands‘, New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, 58(1), 21-28

Park S (2014) ‘Outcome evaluation and documentation process in occupational therapy: occupation-based, client-centered and context-relevant’, Harrison Training.

Pierce D (2001) ‘Occupation by design: Dimensions, therapeutic power, and creative process‘, American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 55, 249–259

Pierce D (2003) Occupation by design: building therapeutic power. Philadelphia, PA: FA Davis Company

Sorlie C, Jones C, Stanley K, Rushton H and Gorry G (2013) Levelling the playing field: developing online communities of practice. Poster presentation at: College of Occupational Therapists Annual Conference. 18th-20th June, Glasgow. Available online at: https://otalkocchats.files.wordpress.com/2013/06/cototalkposter13.pdf

Twinley, R (2012) ‘The dark side of occupation: a concept for consideration’, Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 60, 301-303

Related Blog Posts

Eating Disorders and Occupational Therapy #OTalk

Becoming “a Real OT” – the Rollercoaster Ride blog post

The Kawa Model in Research: Exploring a Third Culture Kid’s Experience

This video was created for the first Kawa International Symposium at Tokyo University of Technology, on the 17th of June 2014.

 

References:

  • Adriansen, H.K. and Madsen, L.M. (2009) ‘Studying the Making of Geographical Knowledge: The Implications of Insider Interviews’, Norwegian Journal of Geography, 63(3), pp. 145-153
  • Pollock, D.C. and Van Reken, R.E. (2009) Third Culture Kids: Growing Up Among Worlds. London: Nicholas Brealy Publishing
  • Sears, C. (2011) ‘Integrating Multiple Identities: Narrative in the Formation and Maintenance of the Self in International School Students’, International Journal of Research in International Education, 10(1), pp. 71-86, DOI: 10.1177/1475240911399262
  • Zilber, E. (no date) ‘Mobility in Metaphor: Colourful Descriptions of Third Culture Kids’, International Schools Journal

 

For more information, see my 24 Hour Virtual Exchange (2014) presentation here.

Being a Third Culture Kid: A River of Transition

Here is the link to the recording of my presentation for this year’s Occupational Therapy 24-our Virtual Exchange (#otvx13): ‘Being a Third Culture Kid: A River of Transition’, which I presented virtually, in my onesie on 26th October 2013. The abstract is available on the OT4OT site. My presentation starts about halfway through, following Kerstin Gadsten’s powerful presentation about shedding a disability label.

If you’re having trouble with the link above (a lot of people are), try this link, and with a different browser

I’ve also uploaded my slides to SlideShare (we had an upload error on the day), which can be viewed below.

References

Bell-Villada, G.H. and Sichel, N. (2011) ‘Introduction’ in Bell-Villada, G.H., Sichel, N., Eidse, F. and Orr, E.N. (eds) Writing Out of Limbo: International Childhoods, Global Nomads and Third Culture Kids. Newcastle Upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 1-16

Cockburn, L. (2002) ‘Children and Young People Living in Changing Worlds: The Process of Assessing and Understanding the Third Culture Kid’, School Psychology International, 23(4), pp.475-485

Cottrell, A.B. (2002) ‘Educational and Occupational Choices of American Adult Third Culture Kids’ in Ender, M.G. (ed) Military Brats and Other Global Nomads: Growing Up in Organization Families. Westport: Praeger Publishers. pp. 229-253

Linderman, P. (2011) ‘Lemonade for the Gringa: Advice For and From Teenaged Global Nomads’ in Bell-Villada, G.H., Sichel, N., Eidse, F. and Orr, E.N. (eds) Writing Out of Limbo: International Childhoods, Global Nomads and Third Culture Kids. Newcastle Upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 210-219

Pollock, D.C. and van Reken, R.E. (2009) Third Culture Kids: Growing Up Among Worlds. London: Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Van Reken, R.E. (2011) ‘Cross-Cultural Kids: the New Prototype’ in Bell-Villada, G.H., Sichel, N., Eidse, F. and Orr, E.N. (eds) Writing Out of Limbo: International Childhoods, Global Nomads and Third Culture Kids. Newcastle Upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 25-44

Walters, K.A. and Auton-Cuff, F.P. (2009) ‘A Story to Tell: the Identity Development of Women Growing Up as Third Culture Kids’, Mental Health, Religion and Culture, 12(7), pp. 755-772

Wu, A.S. (2011) ‘Global Nomads: Cultural Bridges for the Future’ in Bell-Villada, G.H., Sichel, N., Eidse, F. and Orr, E.N. (eds) Writing Out of Limbo: International Childhoods, Global Nomads and Third Culture Kids. Newcastle Upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 332-353

Announcement: #ot24vx Presentation

The schedule for this year’s 24 hour virtual exchange has been published. This year’s topic is ‘Transition’, and I’m very excited to (finally) be able to tell you all:

I’m going to presenting this year on my experience of being a(n adult) third culture kid.

A Third Culture Kid (TCK) is a person who has spent a significant part of his or her developmental years outside the parents’ culture. The TCK frequently builds relationships to all of the cultures, without having full ownership of any.

Pollock and Van Reken (2009) pg. 13

I will be sharing elements of my narrative, using the metaphor of a river (kawa) – expect embarassing photos! But, being the geek that I am, I will also be incorporating bits of theory and research.

I’ve been writing a blog post on the topic, and hope to have it finished in time (this may depend on how hectic this current life transition of moving house/city and starting a new job is).

This event will be a first for me in many ways:

  • My first time presenting at an international conference.
  • My first time presenting at a virtual conference.
  • And, possibly most importantly: My first time speaking publicly in a onesie.
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Photo Credit: ElysiaP (Flickr)

I hope to see you all there! (It’s virtual, and on a Saturday)